Work Those Kidneys Out!

2019-03-28T17:08:07-04:00February 23rd, 2019|Categories: Early Intervention, Fact Sheet, Lifestyle, Physical Health, The Kidney Citizen|

By Collette Powers, MA, RDN, LDN, ACSM EP-C We have all heard it, and we all know it. We have been told from our doctor, a friend or a loved one. Whether it is for controlling high cholesterol, managing weight, reducing blood sugar or keeping our bodies healthy overall, we have all been told at some point we should exercise. But did you know exercise may help protect your kidneys too? Fatigue is a common struggle that many patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) face. When we are tired, our instinct is to rest. However, over time, that “rest” can [...]

Dialysis Patients Looking to Quit Smoking May Be Eligible for Free Counseling Sessions

2019-01-08T16:38:37-04:00November 30th, 2018|Categories: Costs for Treatment, Early Intervention, eNews, What Causes Kidney Disease|Tags: |

Smoking cigarettes can damage your kidneys. Quitting smoking may help your blood pressure, which can lower your risk for having heart attack or stroke. Individuals with high blood pressure have a higher risk of developing chronic kidney disease (1 in 5 adults with high blood pressure may have chronic kidney disease). Medicare Part B covers up to eight counseling sessions centered around quitting smoking during a 12-month period. Make sure your healthcare professional is recognized by Medicare and accepts Medicare’s payment. Visit Medicare’s website for more information.

Bladder Health and Chronic Kidney Disease

2018-11-28T18:46:36-04:00November 10th, 2018|Categories: Early Intervention, eNews, Lifestyle, News & Events, Staying Healthy, Treatment|

November is Bladder Health Month. The bladder is part of the urinary system, which also includes the kidneys. Taking care of the bladder is important for individuals with kidney disease as infections in the bladder can spread to the kidneys, which can cause permanent damage to the kidneys. Additionally, diabetes, which is one of the leading causes of chronic kidney disease, can contribute towards bladder problems. The National Institute of Health has some resources on how the bladder changes as we age and ways to keep your bladder healthy. Check out the resources below: Bladder Health for Older Adults – Discusses [...]

The Quest to Activate a Commonly Inactive Protective Protein

2019-02-06T09:52:08-04:00May 20th, 2018|Categories: Early Intervention, eNews, Nutrition|Tags: , |

New research sponsored by the American Heart Association found high levels of a protective protein, albeit an inactive version of the protein, in the blood of African-Americans on dialysis.  Matrix Gla protein, or MGP, has high affinity binding to calcium ions and therefore inhibiting vascular calcification. Researchers believe finding ways to activate this protein can lead to lower rates of vascular disease in current dialysis patients. MGP is activated by vitamin K and appears to be the only natural inhibitor of vascular calcification while vitamin K is the only known activator of MGP. Active MGP binds to calcium that circulates in [...]

November is Diabetes Awareness Month

2018-12-11T00:33:23-04:00November 20th, 2017|Categories: Early Intervention, Lifestyle, Nutrition, What Causes Kidney Disease|Tags: |

If you have diabetes you are at a higher risk for kidney disease, especially if you have high glucose and high blood pressure. Approximately 1 in 4 adults with diabetes will also develop kidney disease. Your chances increase if you smoke, are overweight, have heart disease, have a family member with kidney disease and you don’t exercise or follow your diabetes food plan. Many people are not aware that they have kidney disease and would benefit from being tested for it. To keep your kidneys as healthy as you can, work with your health care team to keep your glucose and [...]

Research Shows Eating More Fruits and Vegetables Cuts Kidney Patients’ Medicine Expense in Half

2019-02-13T09:37:58-04:00October 19th, 2016|Categories: Early Intervention, eNews, Lifestyle, Medication, Nutrition, What Causes Kidney Disease|Tags: , |

High blood pressure is one of the leading causes of kidney disease. When blood pressure is too high, blood vessel walls can thicken and become stiff which can also damage organs throughout the body such as the kidneys. Not only can high blood pressure damage kidneys, but kidney disease can lead to high blood pressure. If kidneys are damaged and can no longer make an enzyme known as renin, blood pressure can be elevated. With continued emphasis on managing and even preventing chronic conditions to improve overall health, research is continuing to occur to find effective interventions to treat conditions such as [...]

Acid Blockers Could Damage Kidney Function, Study Finds

2019-01-25T22:58:19-04:00July 8th, 2016|Categories: Early Intervention, eNews, Medication|Tags: , |

Proton Pump Inhibitors (PPI), or medications used to treat gastric issues as heartburn and acid reflux, were prescribed to an estimated 15 million people in the United States in 2013. A recent study from the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology, the Veteran’s Affairs Saint Louis Health Care System and Washington University in St. Louis suggests that long-term use of these drugs could lead to chronic kidney disease. To determine the effects of PPI’s on kidney function, researchers looked at more than 173,000 new users of PPIs over a period of five years. Overtime, it was found that PPI users had [...]

Prevention of Kidney Stones Vital for Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease

2019-01-29T20:50:37-04:00March 17th, 2016|Categories: Early Intervention, eNews, Lifestyle, What Causes Kidney Disease|Tags: , |

Some people who repeatedly develop kidney stones may also have high levels of calcium deposits in their blood vessels. A study recently published by the American Society of Nephrology suggests that this could explain their increased risk for cardiovascular disease. "It's becoming clear that having kidney stones is a bit like having raised blood pressure, raised cholesterol, or diabetes in that it is another sign of, or risk factor for, cardiovascular disease and its consequences," said study co-author Robert Unwin of University College London. The main message "is to begin to take having kidney stones seriously in relation to cardiovascular disease [...]

Utilizing Public Resources to Prevent Kidney Disease

2019-01-29T21:18:22-04:00March 17th, 2016|Categories: Early Intervention, eNews, Pediatric Kidney Disease, What Causes Kidney Disease|Tags: |

People living with diabetes know that diabetes might affect their eyes, feet and heart. But, many do not realize that they also have to think about their kidneys. In fact, diabetes is the leading cause of kidney disease, followed by high blood pressure. The National Kidney Disease Education Program (NKDEP), an initiative of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), has a number of helpful resources and materials to educate people at risk for chronic kidney disease (CKD). These materials help people and their loved ones understand the connection between diabetes, high blood pressure and kidney disease. For people with diabetes or [...]

Join Us for a Webinar on Slowing the Progression of Kidney Disease!

2019-01-29T19:02:24-04:00March 17th, 2016|Categories: Early Intervention, eNews, Webinar, What Is Kidney Disease|

March is National Kidney Month, and March 12th is World Kidney Day. With 26 million American adults suffering from kidney disease, it is critical to spread awareness about the disease. Join us Monday, March 9th to hear from a nephrology nurse on how to slow the progression of kidney disease. Our webinar and conference call will take place at 3pm ET and is open to everyone. Please share this information with your facilities, friends and family that may be at risk for kidney disease. To join the call, dial (877) 399-5186 and enter code 433-459-5474. To watch the webinar and follow [...]